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永香肉问 Wing Heong Yok Man – 前卷 The Rice Of Yoke Man

An uncanny bak kwa superhero (Weng Heong) has burst into the social media scene, leaving almost half a million Internet viewers agape with the made-in-Malaysia cartoon hero.

It’s a really awesome YouTube video that I have seen and it required interaction from the viewers, which requires viewers to click the pause and mute buttons and rewind the video to assist Yok Man 肉问 in winning his fight.

永香肉问 Yok Man - 前卷 The Rice Of Yoke Man

Watch it and you will know what I mean!


永香肉问 Wing Heong Yok Man – 前卷 The Rice Of Yoke Man

30年代,第二次世界大戰前夕,大日本帝國對馬來西亞美食界虎視眈眈。
為了瓦解吉隆坡的抗日勢力,日本派遣間諜,進行滲透任務,當時年輕的肉問,亦被牽連其中…

1930’s, on the eve of World War II, the Japanese Empire was eyeing the Malaysian food industry. In order to destroy the anti-Japanese forces in Kuala Lumpur, the Japanese have sent spies for infiltrating missions. The young Yok Man has been implicated by the incident…

Below is the 1st episode of the Yok Man which uploaded early of the year!


永香肉问 Yok Man 一代宗师

‘Meaty’ hero sparks excitement online

KUALA LUMPUR: An uncanny bak kwa superhero has burst into the social media scene, leaving almost half a million Internet viewers agape with the made-in-Malaysia cartoon hero.

The Rice of Yok Man (loosely translated as “the rise of meat man”) is a four-minute video about flat-faced Yok Man, whose character was inspired by the dried sliced meat (known as bak kwa) taking the form of famous Wing Chun martial arts master Ip Man.

Bak kwa is a traditional delicacy enjoyed by the Chinese community, particularly during the Chinese New Year.

“We put up the video on Facebook on Tuesday and by mid-Friday, it had already recorded 444,485 views.

“At last count, there were over 195,000 Facebook likes for the video and about 200 tweets containing positive comments on the video circulated by audiences from many countries, who were all fascinated by the concept,” said PCT Innovations director Wilson Pee, whose online advertising agency was responsible for the production of Yok Man.

The story is set against a hypothetical backdrop of World War II, with the Japanese portrayed as having the desire to conquer the Malaysian food industry.

A food war ensues between the Japanese warlords (who take the form of a sushi and a tempura) and the Malaysian camp , represented by Yok Man and his martial arts compatriots, the egg-head named Double-Yolk Egg and the feminine Seremban Siew Bao.

Witty lines in the Cantonese dialect lace the interactive video, which requires viewers to click the pause and mute buttons to assist Yok Man in winning his fight.

The video with English and Chinese subtitles was created as a publicity gimmick for a local dried meat company.

“Response to the video was massive.

“Our business has picked up since the video went online,” Wing Heong Food Industries Sdn Bhd managing director Yap Sooi Cheng said. Pee said Yok Man was produced completely by its creative team all Malaysians aged below 25.

“Creativity abounds in the young people and they can do marvellous things, whether or not they are certified,” Pee quipped, referring to the proposed Computing Professionals Bill which came under fire from information technology professionals recently.

Under the Bill, the Government would set up a board to oversee the registration of computing practitioners, computing professionals, sole proprietorships, partnerships and corpo rate bodies providing computing services.

Source : TheStar

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Author: Saimatkong

This blog is a platform to share what I love in life: food (eat), travel (play), photography (art) and life (thoughts and ideas). With passion for food, I share my foodie adventures and indulgences here. “There is no love sincerer than the love of food.”

Traveling makes us a better human being as we recognise the similarities and celebrate the differences of cultures between where we travel to and where we come from. “The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.”

Photography do more than just capturing the best moments in our lives; they also help us tell our life stories. “Photography is a way of feeling, of touching, of loving. What you have caught on film is captured forever… it remembers little things, long after you have forgotten everything.”

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